New Non-Fiction

After Jesus before Christianity : a historical exploration of the first two centuries of Jesus movements

After Jesus before Christianity : a historical exploration of the first two centuries of Jesus movements

by Vearncombe, Erin

From the creative minds of the scholarly group behind the groundbreaking Jesus Seminar comes this provocative and eye-opening look at the roots of Christianity that offers a thoughtful reconsideration of the first two centuries of the Jesus movement, transforming our understanding of the religion and its early dissemination.

Chasing history : a kid in the newsroom

Chasing history : a kid in the newsroom

by Bernstein, Carl

"In this ... memoir, Carl Bernstein, the Pulitzer Prize-winning coauthor of All the President's Men and pioneer of investigative journalism, recalls his beginnings as an audacious teenage newspaper reporter in the nation's capital--a ... tale of scrapes, gumshoeing, and American bedlam"-- Provided by publisher

Finding me

Finding me

by Davis, Viola

"Much-anticipated, emotionally-charged debut memoir from award-winning actor and icon Viola Davis"--. Provided by publisher.

Fridge love : organize your refrigerator for a healthier, happier life--with 100 recipes

Fridge love : organize your refrigerator for a healthier, happier life--with 100 recipes

by Hong, Kristen

"Practicing "fridge love" is a roadmap to eating healthier, saving money, and reducing food waste while enjoying a beautiful and harder-working fridge. This book--part organizational guide and part food-prep handbook--is your guide. Author Kristen Hong adopted a nutrient-dense, plant-based diet in an effort to lose weight and improve her health. But amidst the demands of day-to-day life and a busy family, she found it impossible to stick to. The solution? A smarter, better-organized fridge that served her real-life needs. In this invaluable resource, you will discover how a beautifully organized fridge can make your life--including healthy eating for the whole family--easier. It covers general fridge organization (for all models and configurations) as well as shopping tips, storage guidelines, the best meal-prep containers, and more than 100 easy plant-based recipes made for meal prepping"

Garden allies : the insects, birds, & other animals that keep your garden beautiful and thriving

Garden allies : the insects, birds, & other animals that keep your garden beautiful and thriving

by Lavoipierre, Frédérique

"The birds, mammals, reptiles, and insects that inhabit our yards and gardens are overwhelmingly on our side--they are not our enemies, but instead our allies. They pollinate our flowers and vegetable crops, and they keep pests in check. In Garden Allies, Frédérique Lavoipierre shares fascinating portraits of these creatures, describing their life cycles and showing how they keep the garden's ecology in balance. Also included is helpful information on how to nurture and welcome these valuable creatures into your garden."--. Amazon.com.

Heiresses : the lives of the million dollar babies

Heiresses : the lives of the million dollar babies

by Thompson, Laura

Heiresses: surely they are among the luckiest women on earth. Are they not to be envied, with their private jets and Chanel wardrobes and endless funds? Yet all too often those gilded lives have been beset with trauma and despair. Before the 20th century a wife's inheritance was the property of her husband, making her vulnerable to kidnap, forced marriages, even confinement in an asylum. And in modern times, heiresses fell victim to fortune-hunters who squandered their millions. Heiresses tells the stories of these women: Mary Davies, who inherited London's most valuable real estate, and was bartered from the age of twelve; Consuelo Vanderbilt, the original American "Dollar Heiress", forced into a loveless marriage; Barbara Hutton, the Woolworth heiress who married seven times and died almost penniless; Patty Hearst, heiress to a newspaper fortune who was arrested for terrorism. However, there are also stories of achievement: Angela Burdett-Coutts, who became one of the greatest philanthropists of Victorian England; Nancy Cunard, who lived off her mother's fortune and became a pioneer of the civil rights movement; Daisy Fellowes, elegant linchpin of interwar high society and noted fashion editor. Heiresses is about the lives of the rich, who-as F. Scott Fitzgerald said-are 'different'. But it is also a bigger story about how all women fought their way to equality, and sometimes even found autonomy and fulfilment. Provided by publisher.

In search of Van Gogh : capturing the life of the artist through photographs and paintings

In search of Van Gogh : capturing the life of the artist through photographs and paintings

by Fossi, Gloria

Follow in the footsteps of Vincent Van Gogh, from his birthplace in Zundert, Netherlands, to his last days in Auvers-sur-Oise, France, and explore the hidden inspirations behind the world-renowned artist's most famous paintings in this beautiful art book and travelogue, illustrated with more than 250 black-and-white and full-color images throughout.

Just pursuit : a Black prosecutor's fight for fairness

Just pursuit : a Black prosecutor's fight for fairness

by Coates, Laura

"A ... true story and ... account of bias in the courtroom from CNN senior legal analyst Laura Coates, recounting her time as a Black female prosecutor for the US Department of Justice"--. Provided by publisher.

Pandemic : tracking contagions, from cholera to ebola and beyond

Pandemic : tracking contagions, from cholera to ebola and beyond

by Shah, Sonia

"Interweaving history, original reportage, and personal narrative, Pandemic explores the origins of epidemics, drawing parallels between the story of cholera--one of history's most disruptive and deadly pathogens--and the new pathogens that stalk humankind today"-- Provided by publisher.

Real food fermentation : preserving whole fresh food with live cultures in your home kitchen

Real food fermentation : preserving whole fresh food with live cultures in your home kitchen

by Lewin, Alex

"Learn how to choose and prepare only the best, freshest ingredients for all your kitchen fermenting projects with Real Food Fermentation! Learn how to make tasty foods including kimchi, yogurt, and sauerkraut. Improves digestion. Enzyme-rich foods contain high nutrient value. Boosts "good" bacteria production. Fermentation is one of the earliest forms of natural food preservation, and without it, our beloved vegetables, fruits, grains, and milk would be heaps of moldy abundance after the harvest. Learn how to turn simple ingredients into health goldmines such as kimchi, sauerkraut, kefir, kombucha, and more in this flavorful book. Author and health strategist Alex Lewin empowers you with the tools, techniques, instructions, and delicious recipes to make all fermented foods at home in this essential book for your culinary library. Inside, you'll find recipes for making coleslaws, preserved lemons, ceviche, vinegars, yogurt, and more. The science, art, and craft of fermenting foods are also explained in meaningful detail."-- Provided by publisher.

Scoundrel how a convicted murderer persuaded the women who loved him, the conservative establishment, and the courts to set him free / [large print] :

Scoundrel how a convicted murderer persuaded the women who loved him, the conservative establishment, and the courts to set him free / [large print] :

by Weinman, Sarah

In the 1960s, Edgar Smith, in prison and sentenced to death for the murder of teenager Victoria Zielinski, struck up a correspondence with William F. Buckley, the founder of National Review. Buckley, who refused to believe that a man who supported the neoconservative movement could have committed such a heinous crime, began to advocate not only for Smith's life to be spared but also for his sentence to be overturned. So begins a bizarre and tragic tale of mid-century America. Sarah Weinman's Scoundrel leads us through the twists of fate and fortune that brought Smith to freedom, book deals, fame, and eventually to attempting murder again. In Smith, Weinman has uncovered a psychopath who slipped his way into public acclaim and acceptance before crashing down to earth once again.

Taste my life through food / [large print] :

Taste my life through food / [large print] :

by Tucci, Stanley

Stanley Tucci grew up in an Italian American family that spent every night around the kitchen table. He shared the magic of those meals with us in The Tucci Cookbook and The Tucci Table, and now he takes us beyond the savory recipes and into the compelling stories behind them.​

The beginner's guide to chicken breeds : an introductory guide to choosing the right flock

The beginner's guide to chicken breeds : an introductory guide to choosing the right flock

by Bradshaw, Amber

Deciding to raise chickens is one thing, but figuring out which breeds will suit your needs is another--especially with hundreds of different types! Whether you're raising chickens for eggs, meat, companionship, or show, The Beginner's Guide to Chicken Breeds has all the information you need to get started. This easy-to-use reference book helps you assess your needs and guides you in making the best decisions for beginning or expanding your flock.

The betrayal of Anne Frank : a cold case investigation

The betrayal of Anne Frank : a cold case investigation

by Sullivan, Rosemary

Using new technology, recently discovered documents and sophisticated investigative techniques, an international team--led by an obsessed retired FBI agent--has finally solved the mystery that has haunted generations since World War II: Who betrayed Anne Frank and her family? And why?

The dawn of everything : a new history of humanity

The dawn of everything : a new history of humanity

by Graeber, David

A trailblazing account of human history, challenging our most fundamental assumptions about social evolution-from the development of agriculture and cities to the emergence of "the state," political violence, and social inequality-and revealing new possibilities for human emancipation. For generations, our remote ancestors have been cast as primitive and childlike--either free and equal innocents, or thuggish and warlike. Civilization, we are told, could be achieved only by sacrificing those original freedoms or, alternatively, by taming our baser instincts. David Graeber and David Wengrow show how such theories first emerged in the eighteenth century as a conservative reaction to powerful critiques of European society posed by Indigenous observers and intellectuals. Revisiting this encounter has startling implications for how we make sense of human history today, including the origins of farming, property, cities, democracy, slavery, and civilization itself. Drawing on pathbreaking research in archaeology and anthropology, the authors show how history becomes a far more interesting place once we learn to throw off our conceptual shackles and perceive what's really there. If humans did not spend 95 percent of their evolutionary past in tiny bands of hunter-gatherers, what were they doing all that time? If agriculture, and cities, did not mean a plunge into hierarchy and domination, then what kinds of social and economic organization did they lead to? The answers are often unexpected, and suggest that the course of human history may be less set in stone, and more full of playful, hopeful possibilities, than we tend to assume. The Dawn of Everything fundamentally transforms our understanding of the human past and offers a path toward imagining new forms of freedom, new ways of organizing society. Provided by publisher.

The game night cookbook : snacks, noshes, and drinks for good times

The game night cookbook : snacks, noshes, and drinks for good times

by Scott-Goodman, Barbara

"A playful cookbook for the next big game, poker night, or board game party. The Game Night Cookbook delivers smart methods for prepping and serving snacks, appetizers, small plates, sandwiches, desserts, and drinks that will please a crowd. Beyond just delicious recipes for Cacio e Pepe Popcorn, Gochujang Chicken Wings, Luscious Lemon Wafers, or a big batch of Peach & Strawberry Sangria, readers will find suggested menus perfect for lively get-togethers such as Competitive Party Game Nights, At-Home Theater Evenings, An Afternoon of Cards, and a Swanky Cocktail Party. Each menu will feature a day-by-day game plan for prepping food and setting up the bar, helping hosts entertain with ease, and making sure that he or she won't miss out on too much of the fun. With the popularity of board games on the rise and the film industry often releasing major movies direct to view from the comfort of home, this book celebrates inviting, intimate gatherings and emphasizes the importance of living and eating well in this era of non-ostentatious, casual entertaining"--. Provided by publisher.

The girls who stepped out of line : untold stories of the women who changed the course of World War II

The girls who stepped out of line : untold stories of the women who changed the course of World War II

by Eder, Mari K.

"The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told--and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come."--. Provided by publisher.

The musical child : using the power of music to raise children who are happy, healthy, and whole

The musical child : using the power of music to raise children who are happy, healthy, and whole

by Koenig, Joan

Since opening her famed Parisian conservatory over three decades ago, Joan Koenig has led a global movement to improve children's lives and minds with the transformative power of music. With a curriculum and philosophy drawn from cutting-edge science, L'Ecole Koenig has educated and empowered even its youngest students, from baby Max, whose coordination and communication grow as he wiggles and coos along to targeted songs and dance, to five-year-old Constance, who nourishes her empathy, creativity, and memory while practicing music from other cultures. In The Musical Child, Koenig shares stories from her classrooms, along with tips about how to use the latest research during the critical years when children are most sensitive to musical exposure--and most receptive to its benefits.

The president and the freedom fighter : Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and their battle to save America's soul

The president and the freedom fighter : Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and their battle to save America's soul

by Kilmeade, Brian

Brian Kilmeade tells the little-known story of how Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass moved from strong disagreement to friendship, uniting over their love for the Constitution and over their surprising commonalities. Both came from destitution. Both were self-educated and self-made men. Both had fought hard for what they believed in. As he did in George Washington's Secret Six, Kilmeade has transformed this nearly forgotten slice of history into a dramatic story that will keep you turning the pages to find out how these two men changed each other.

The reason for the darkness of the night : Edgar Allan Poe and the forging of American science

The reason for the darkness of the night : Edgar Allan Poe and the forging of American science

by Tresch, John

"A biography of Edgar Allan Poe with an emphasis on his engagement with the scientists and scientific discoveries of his era"-- Provided by publisher

The speckled beauty : a dog and his people

The speckled beauty : a dog and his people

by Bragg, Rick

"Speck is not a good boy. He is a terrible boy, a defiant self-destructive, often malodorous boy, a grave robber and a screen-door muncher who spends his days playing chicken with the FedEx man, picking up livestock, and rolling in donkey manure, and his nights howling at the moon. He has been that way since the moment he appeared on the ridgeline behind Rick Bragg's house. Speck arrived in Rick's life at a moment of looming uncertainty, as he stared down a litany of physical ailments straight from the Old Testament, and a creeping sadness from deaths in his great family. Speck helped, and he is helping, still, when he is not peeing on the rose of Sharon. Written with Rick Bragg's inimitable blend of tenderness and sorrow, humor and grit, The Speckled Beauty captures the extraordinary sustaining devotion between two damaged creatures who need each other to heal." -- From book jacket

The storyteller : tales of life and music

The storyteller : tales of life and music

by Grohl, David

Grohl offers an honest portrait of an extraordinary life made up of ordinary moments. From his deep connection to his hometown of Springfield, Virginia, to the awe he still feels about raising his daughters, he tells stories from his soul. Packed with reflections on touring with Scream, joining Nirvana and watching it all crumble, creating Foo Fighters when his life was at a crossroads, and now crisscrossing the world as a family man, Grohl introduces himself to us as a gifted, engaging writer with a clear-eyed perspective on fame.

The woman they could not silence : one woman, her incredible fight for freedom, and the men who tried to make her disappear

The woman they could not silence : one woman, her incredible fight for freedom, and the men who tried to make her disappear

by Moore, Kate

"1860: As the clash between the states rolls slowly to a boil, Elizabeth Packard, housewife and mother of six, is facing her own battle. The enemy sits across the table and sleeps in the next room. Threatened by Elizabeth's intellect, independence, and outspokenness, her husband of twenty-one years is plotting against her and makes a plan to put her back in her place. One summer morning, he has her committed to an insane asylum. The horrific conditions inside the Illinois State Hospital in Jacksonville, Illinois, are overseen by Dr. Andrew McFarland, a man who will prove to be even more dangerous to Elizabeth than her traitorous husband. But most disturbing is that Elizabeth is not the only sane woman confined to the institution. There are many rational women on her ward who tell the same story: they've been committed not because they need medical treatment, but to keep them in line--conveniently labeled "crazy" so their voices are ignored. No one is willing to fight for their freedom, and disenfranchised both by gender and the stigma of their supposed madness, they cannot possibly fight for themselves. But Elizabeth is about to discover that the merit of losing everything is that you then have nothing to lose..."-- Provided by publisher.

Van Gogh and the artists he loved

Van Gogh and the artists he loved

by Naifeh, Steven

"To us, Van Gogh's paintings look utterly unique. His vivid palates and wildly interpretive portraits are unmistakably his--yet however revolutionary his style may have been, it was actually built on a strong foundation of paintings by other artists, both his contemporaries and those who came before him. Now, drawing on Van Gogh's own thoughtful and often poetic comments about the artists he venerated, Steven Naifeh gives a gripping account of his deep immersion in their work. We see Van Gogh's gradual discovery of the subjects he made famous, from wheat fields to sunflowers. We watch him copying the colors used by one artist, experimenting with the thick layers of paint on canvas used by another, all vividly illustrated with 275 paintings by Van Gogh and a variety of other major artists, positioned side by side. Thanks to the vast correspondence from Vincent to his beloved brother Theo, Naifeh is able to reconstruct Van Gogh's artistic world from within. Observed in eloquent prose that is as compelling as it is authoritative, Van Gogh and the Artists He Loved enables us to share the artist's journey as he established his own audacious, influential, and widely beloved body of work"-- Provided by publisher.

Voices from the pandemic : Americans tell their stories of crisis, courage and resilience

Voices from the pandemic : Americans tell their stories of crisis, courage and resilience

by Saslow, Eli

"The Covid-19 pandemic was a world-shattering event, affecting everyone in the nation. From its first ominous stirrings, renowned journalist Eli Saslow began interviewing a cross-section of Americans, capturing their experiences in real time: An exhausted and anguished EMT risking his life in New York City; a grocery store owner feeding his neighborhood for free in locked-down New Orleans; an overwhelmed coroner in Georgia; a Maryland restaurateur forced to close his family business after forty-six years; an Arizona teacher wrestling with her fears and her obligations to her students; rural citizens adamant that the whole thing is a hoax, and retail workers attacked for asking people to wear masks; patients struggling to breathe and doctors desperately trying to save them. Through Saslow's masterful, empathetic interviewing, we are given a kaleidoscopic picture of a people dealing with the unimaginable. These deeply personal accounts make for cathartic reading, as we see Americans at their worst, and at their resilient best"-- Provided by publisher

We keep the dead close : a murder at Harvard and a half century of silence

We keep the dead close : a murder at Harvard and a half century of silence

by Cooper, Becky

"1969: the height of counterculture; the year Harvard would begin the tumultuous process of merging with sister school Radcliffe; and the year that Jane Britton, an ambitious graduate student in Harvard's Anthropology department, would be found bludgeoned to death in her apartment. Forty years later, Becky Cooper, a curious undergrad, will first hear whispers of the story: The dead was nameless. A student had an affair with her professor, and he murdered her in the Peabody Museum. Though this rumor would prove false, it started an investigation that would consume Cooper's life for the next ten years. WE KEEP THE DEAD CLOSE is a narrative of mirrors, misogyny, and murder. It is at once a rumination on the violence and oppression that rules our revered institutions, a ghost story reflecting one young woman's past onto another's present, and a love story for a girl who was lost to history."--Dust jacket flap.

Wild souls : freedom and flourishing in the non-human world

Wild souls : freedom and flourishing in the non-human world

by Marris, Emma

"From an acclaimed environmental writer, a groundbreaking and provocative new vision for our relationships with--and responsibilities toward--the planet's wild animals"-- Provided by publisher

Women in white coats : how the first women doctors changed the world of medicine

Women in white coats : how the first women doctors changed the world of medicine

by Campbell, Olivia

Documents the true stories of three pioneering women who defied Victorian-era boundaries to become the first women doctors, discussing how they banded together to support each other and advocate for women's health in a male-dominated field.